Some products at the Cambridge Farmers' Market are only available during certain seasons because different crops grow at different times of the year. Below is a list of what's in season each month. Please note these are approximate dates and may vary according to local weather. 

Be sure to check out our Recipe Book for different ways to use Kale in your meals!

May: Kale

Kale is a dark green, leafy vegetable that is part of the cabbage family. In addition to dark green, kale is also available in a variety of other colours such as purple, white, and even pink. Although part of the
cabbage family, kale does not grow in a tightly bound head but on long, fibrous stalks that cascade out from the center of a bunch.

What to look for when buying/picking:

Kale can be purchased in a bunch with stems intact or pre-chopped and bagged with the stems removed. Either way the leaves should have a deep, vibrant colour and feel crisp and sturdy to the touch

What to Avoid:

Always remove the stems from your kale before using. The fibre is so thick in the stems that it can cause digestive problems. Stay away from limp, dull or yellowed leaves.

How is it Grown/Made?

Kale is a cool weather crop that requires two months of cool weather to reach harvest. Farmers sow seeds indoors or outdoors 4 to 6 weeks before the last frost in spring or as soon as the soil can be worked. Kale is commonly started indoors and transplanted into the garden when seedlings are 4 to 6 weeks old. Kale grows above ground so it can collect ample nutrients from the sun.  Kale produces an erect stem that can grow close to the ground or reach the height of 6 to 7 feet, depending on the variety. The Kale is ready for harvest when the leaves are about hand size.

Did you know?

After a frost, kale becomes sweeter.

Kale is an amazing source of carotenoids, which are linked to one’s level of optimism.

Kale has more than twice the Vitamin C of an orange!

Eating kale with fatty foods, like avocado, olive oil, or parmesan cheese makes it easier for your body to
absorb some of the nutrients kale has to offer.

Kale has been grown around the world for over 6,000 years.

Types of Kale:

Baby Kale

More tender than adult kale, baby kale is best eaten raw. Baby kale are the delicate leaves of the young immature kale plant. Their flavor is milder than that of traditional kale and has a slightly peppery flavour, similar to that of arugula.  Both the petite stems and leaves of Baby kale are edible and have a delicate yet slightly chewy mouth feel. Because kale is such a rough and thick green, many people find it hard to chew. Baby kale is a good alternative due to its tenderness.

Curly Kale

This is the type of kale you usually see in the grocery store. It’s a pale to deep green with large, frilly-edged leaves and long stems. It’s often sold as loose leaves bound together, even though it grows as a loose head. Put it in salad (using our softening tips), sauté, toss it in a hearty bean soup, or blend it in a fruit smoothie.

Lacinato Kale (Dinosaur Kale, Tuscan Kale)

The dark blue-green, slender, long leaves have none of the curls and frills common in kales. Rather, the leaves are rumpled and puckered like savoy cabbage and curled under along the entire margin.

Red Russian Kale

This kale heirloom looks like overgrown oak leaves in colours ranging from blue-green to purple-red. It’s essentially a rutabaga developed for its top growth rather than its root. Among its major advantages, it tastes good (semi-sweet) raw in salads, and looks pretty too. Cold weather intensifies its colour. It is sweeter and more tender than common kale.

 

January
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse Lettuce
February 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
March 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
April 
  • Lettuce
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Rutabaga
May 
  • Asparagus
  • Fiddle heads
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
June 
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • New potatoes
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
July 
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Cucumber
  • Field tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Peaches
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet Onions
  • Rutabaga
August 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Squash
  • Sweet peppers
  • Yellow beans
September 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
October 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
November 
  • Apples
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
December 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga

Year Round

  • Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Olive Oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Preserves
  • Baked goods
  • Coffee
  • Juices
  • Wine and cider
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey

 

Learn about the benefits of buying local.