Some products at the Cambridge Farmers' Market are only available during certain seasons because different crops grow at different times of the year. Below is a list of what's in season each month. Please note these are approximate dates and may vary according to local weather. 

Be sure to check out our Recipe Book for different ways to use fresh ingredients in your meals!

What's In Season in May - Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a species of plant in the family Polygonaceae. It is a herbaceous perennial growing from short, thick rhizomes. It produces large poisonous leaves that are somewhat triangular, with long fleshy edible stalks and small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

In culinary use, fresh raw leaf stalks are crisp with a strong, tart taste. Although rhubarb is not a true fruit, in the kitchen it is usually prepared as if it were.

What to Look for
Look for crisp, firm stalks. Colour may vary from various shades of green to deep ruby red. Greenhouse rhubarb has very small bright yellow-green leaves, rosier-coloured stalks, and milder flavour than that grown naturally outdoors.

What to Avoid

If the vegetable is rotting or looks like it has been infected do not consume it.
Rhubarb leaves are poisonous. DO NOT consume them, even cooked. Remove leaves and throw out or compost.

How is it Grown?

Rhubarb plants take three years to establish themselves, after this period, the stems can be harvested. Farmers leave 2-3 stalks on each plant so that they can regrow.

Rhubarb stalks grow above the ground with their roots and base of the plant in the soil below.  The plants will be dormant over the winter and start to regrow and produce each year. Harvest season last 8-10 weeks.

Did you know?

  • Rhubarb is botanically a vegetable but we treat it like a fruit in cooking and often eat it in desserts.  In 1947, the United States gave it the legal designation as a “fruit” to avoid the high tariffs imposed on imported
    vegetables.

  • Rhubarb root has been used as a laxative in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.

  • Rhubarb leaves are poisonous, chock full of more oxalic acid than humans and animals may safely
    consume.  Small amounts of oxalic acid are found in the stalks which we eat.  The acidity gives rhubarb its “tang.”

  • Rhubarb’s binomial name is Rheum rhabarbarum – the specific epithet is from the Latin and means “root of the barbarians.”

     

 Try It

January
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse Lettuce
February 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
March 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
April 
  • Lettuce
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Rutabaga
May 
  • Asparagus
  • Fiddle heads
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
June 
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • New potatoes
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
July 
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Cucumber
  • Field tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Peaches
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet Onions
  • Rutabaga
August 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Squash
  • Sweet peppers
  • Yellow beans
September 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
October 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
November 
  • Apples
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
December 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga

Year Round

  • Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Olive Oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Preserves
  • Baked goods
  • Coffee
  • Juices
  • Wine and cider
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey

 

Learn about the benefits of buying local.