Some products at the Cambridge Farmers' Market are only available during certain seasons because different crops grow at different times of the year. Below is a list of what's in season each month. Please note these are approximate dates and may vary according to local weather. 

Be sure to check out our Recipe Book for different ways to use fresh ingredients in your meals!

What's In Season in August

Corn

The fruit of the sweet corn plant is the corn kernel, a type of fruit called a caryopsis. The ear is a collection of kernels on the cob. Because corn is a monocot, there is always an even number of rows of kernels. The ear is covered by tightly wrapped leaves called the husk. Corn can be eaten cooked or dried and popped.

What to Look for

Fully ripe sweet corn has bright green, moist husks. The silk should be stiff, dark and moist. You should be able to feel individual kernels by pressing gently against the husk.

What to Avoid

The best way to tell if your corn on the cob is going bad is to look at the top spray, if it is moist and
darkening that is not a good sign. Often mould will begin to form on a moist tip. If this happens, cut off the mould if it has not spread too far or throw out the entire cob. If fresh corn cobs have been left on the counter they will dry out, starting with the outer husk. the colour of the husk will be a lighter green and dry looking. This corn will cook up chewy and flavorless instead of moist and tasty.

 How is it Grown

Once the seed or kernel is planted in an inch or two of soil, it germinates in 5 to 12 days, depending on the variety and the soil temperature. Corn won't germinate if the soil temperature is below 55° F. It germinates fastest in soil that's 68° to 86° F.

After the seed sprouts, it sends down a taproot and starts to develop its first leaves. These leaves resemble blades of grass when they sprout. Once pollination takes place, the kernels begin to develop on each cob. It usually takes about three weeks from silking for the first ears to be ready to harvest. The weather plays a big part here. The kernels develop fastest when the weather is hot and there's plenty of water. If it's too cool or too dry, the harvest will be delayed.

 Fun Facts about Corn

  • Corn is called maize by most countries, this comes from the Spanish word ‘maiz’.

  • Corn is a cereal crop that is part of the grass family. 

  • An ear or cob of corn is actually part of the flower and an individual kernel is a seed.

  • On average an ear of corn has 800 kernels in 16 rows.

  • Corn will always have an even number of rows on each cob.

  • Corn and its by-products are also found in many non-food items such as fireworks, rust preventatives, glue, paint, dyes, laundry detergent, soap, aspirin, antibiotics, paint, shoe polish, ink, cosmetics, the manufacturing of photographic film and in the production of plastics.

     

Feature Recipe

Avacado and Grilled Corn Salad

January
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse Lettuce
February 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
March 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
April 
  • Lettuce
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Rutabaga
May 
  • Asparagus
  • Fiddle heads
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
June 
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • New potatoes
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
July 
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Cucumber
  • Field tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Peaches
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet Onions
  • Rutabaga
August 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Squash
  • Sweet peppers
  • Yellow beans
September 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
October 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
November 
  • Apples
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
December 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga

Year Round

  • Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Olive Oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Preserves
  • Baked goods
  • Coffee
  • Juices
  • Wine and cider
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey

 

Learn about the benefits of buying local.