Some products at the Cambridge Farmers' Market are only available during certain seasons because different crops grow at different times of the year. Below is a list of what's in season each month. Please note these are approximate dates and may vary according to local weather. 

Be sure to check out our Recipe Book for different ways to use fresh ingredients in your meals!

What's In Season in August

This month we are going to dive into the world of Raspberries, read below to find out all you need to know about this wonderful fruit!

Raspberries have hollow cores (that's the prime difference between them and blackberries) and come in delicate pink to deep red to golden and even black. Raspberries are perhaps the most delicate of all the berries. They are soft and sweet with a slightly sour zest when eaten fresh.

What to look for when Buying or picking:

Look for matte berries with no bruising, crushing or anything remotely out of sorts.

What to avoid when buying or picking:

Avoid crushed, overly soft and bruised Raspberries. Raspberries do not keep for very long and should not be consumed if they are over a week old.

How is it Grown?

Raspberries grow on small bushes. They thrive in cooler climates although there are some varieties that can grow in warmer areas.  Bushes need a full year to grow before producing berries so raspberries will start to grow during the second harvest season and continue yearly until the bush dies. Raspberries are usually ready to pick 4-6 weeks after the start of the growing season. A ripe and ready to pick berry is known by its colour. Red raspberries are green when growing and turn red, while black or purple raspberries are red when growing and darken when ripe.

Varieties:

Red Raspberries

These are the common and more recognizable raspberry. There are multiple varieties of red raspberries and they are all similar in taste and texture. More acidic than other colours of raspberries, red berries are good for making jam as well as for eating fresh.

Golden Raspberries

Golden raspberries carry a similar flavour to their red
counterparts although they are known to be less acidic and slightly sweeter than the red raspberry.  Aside from the notable colour difference, red and golden raspberries are interchangeable in recipes.

Black and Purple Raspberries

Commonly mistaken for blackberries, these raspberries are dark in colour. Unlike their red counterparts, black and purple raspberries start growing red when unripe and darken into ripeness.

Black and purple raspberries are closely related to the reds, although they are larger and more productive and greatly tolerant of heat. They are however, less resistant to cold climates.

Raspberry plants with black berries, which are also called blackcaps ripen earlier than those with purple berries. Purple berries have bigger fruit and more distinctive flavour. The berries are not as juicy as red raspberries and are used
primarily to make appetizing raspberry jams and jellies.

Did you know?

Raspberries have been crossed with other berries to form new species. The loganberry is a cross between raspberries and blackberries. The boysenberry is a cross between red raspberries, blackberries and loganberries. The nessberry is a cross between a dewberry, raspberry and blackberry and other crosses include laxtonberries, veitchberries, and mahdiberries.

There are over 200 different known species of raspberries.

Raspberries are a type of fruit known as an aggregate fruit. Aggregate fruits have flowers with multiple ovaries and each ovary produces droplets around a core formed by the flower. Each droplet could actually be considered a separate fruit.

 

January
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse Lettuce
February 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
March 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
April 
  • Lettuce
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Rutabaga
May 
  • Asparagus
  • Fiddle heads
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
June 
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • New potatoes
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
July 
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Cucumber
  • Field tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Peaches
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet Onions
  • Rutabaga
August 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Squash
  • Sweet peppers
  • Yellow beans
September 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
October 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
November 
  • Apples
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
December 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga

Year Round

  • Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Olive Oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Preserves
  • Baked goods
  • Coffee
  • Juices
  • Wine and cider
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey

 

Learn about the benefits of buying local.