Some products at the Cambridge Farmers' Market are only available during certain seasons because different crops grow at different times of the year. Below is a list of what's in season each month. Please note these are approximate dates and may vary according to local weather. 

Be sure to check out our Recipe Book for different ways to use fresh ingredients in your meals!

What's In Season in October

Beets 

Beets are made up of an edible root and edible stalk or leaf. There are 10-12 beets in red and green or yellow and green leafy stems that ascend from the beets smooth, red or yellow bulbous root. Small or medium beets are generally more tender than larger ones. Beets contain the highest sugar content of any vegetable and typically taste very sweet.

What to Look for

A beet should be firm to the touch with vibrant green leaves on the red or yellow stem. Look for beets with their fresh, leafy greens still attached if possible – you will know those are fresh.

What to Avoid

If a beet is soft to the touch or squishy when still raw it has gone bad. Avoid beets with holes and large cuts as this is a sign of damage or pests.

How is it Grown

Beets require 45 to 65 days to reach
harvest. They are grown underground with their red and green stems collecting the sunlight while the root enjoys the nutrients of the soil. They grow well in cool temperatures in spring and fall and do poorly in hot weather.

Types of Beets

Red Beets: These beets are basic, sweet and earthy.  The great thing about red beets, however is that they are amazing storage vegetables. They get a bit less tender as they are stored but also gain in sweetness along the way. Red beets can be used in many ways but most frequently roasted. This also makes them a great way to make them easy to peel.

Golden Beets: A bit less sweet than red beets, but also have a more mellow and less earthy flavour all around. If nothing else, golden beets add a bright, zesty yellow colour when served roasted or in salads. They are also nice to add to a pan of roasted vegetables since they don't stain everything pink the way red beets do.

Chioggia: These beets are naturally striped. Some are a subtle yellow-and-orange combination while others come with a brilliant red-and-cream candy cane effect. Use them as you would other beets and know that the stunning striping usually fades or even disappears when the beets are cooked. 

Baby Beets: Any beet can be sold as a "baby beet." They are simply the beets that are pulled to thin the field in the spring in order to make room for other beets to grow. Smart farmers sell these small specimens as a specialty item. They are very tender and usually have beautiful, luscious greens – don't let those go to waste! Baby beets can also be served with their greens. 

 Fun Facts about Eggplant

  • Looking to eliminate garlic breath? Drink raw beet juice or eat raw beets. Consuming raw fruits and veggies, specifically beets, helps decrease the concentration of certain odours with their super powerful odour-eliminating enzymes.

  • In 1975, during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, astronauts from Apollo 18 were welcomed with beetroot soup (borscht) at zero gravity by cosmonauts from the USSR's Soyuz 19.

  • Beets can be used to test levels of stomach acid. Drinking beet juice and beet consumption may give your urine and bowel movements a red color. Do not be alarmed! This condition called Beeturia and is not considered harmful. Eating beets and/or drinking beet juice is a great way to determine healthy stomach acid levels; healthy stomach levels should be balanced, neither too low or too acidic.

Feature Recipe

Roasted Beet and Feta Salad

January
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse Lettuce
February 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
March 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
April 
  • Lettuce
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Rutabaga
May 
  • Asparagus
  • Fiddle heads
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
June 
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • New potatoes
  • Onions
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
July 
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Cucumber
  • Field tomatoes
  • Garlic
  • Green peppers
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Peaches
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Raspberries
  • Spinach
  • Strawberries
  • Sweet Onions
  • Rutabaga
August 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Squash
  • Sweet peppers
  • Yellow beans
September 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
October 
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Cherries
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Grapes
  • Green beans
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Hot peppers
  • Melons
  • Mushrooms
  • Nectarines
  • Onions
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Peas
  • Plums
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkins
  • Raspberries
  • Rutabaga
  • Sweet peppers
  • Squash
  • Yellow beans
November 
  • Apples
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Pears
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
December 
  • Carrots
  • Greenhouse lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga

Year Round

  • Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Olive Oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Preserves
  • Baked goods
  • Coffee
  • Juices
  • Wine and cider
  • Maple syrup
  • Honey

 

Learn about the benefits of buying local.